strange little girl, where are you going?

My almost-blog.

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Both Sides

I’m hesitant about adding to this conversation, because I’m white. But I have firsthand experience with police misconduct, and I want to use that experience to illustrate something.

When I was 18 and a freshman at Pitt, the G-20 Summit came to Pittsburgh and a bunch of riot police from all over the country beat the crap out of the city and my school and everyone they could get their hands on. I legal observed for the ACLU during one of the major protests, witnessed a lot of beatings, got tear gassed, and then was arrested while off-duty six hours later, holding open the door to let a bunch of students into their dorm before the police crushed them all. My arresting officer, a huge man in full riot gear, didn’t say “you’re under arrest, come with me” or anything like that to see if I would go peacefully. He just approached me from behind, grabbed my wrist and threw me on the ground like a ragdoll, then pinned me face-first to the patio and put me in zipties. My knees were scraped up and bled all night, I had a big lump on my head, and my wrists were bruised the next morning from my zip ties being too tight. My arresting officer was incredibly unprofessional and disrespectful (called me ‘babe’, made jokes about how I should try not to look beat up in my mug shot or he’d get in trouble). I was later charged with failure to disperse, with officers citing an order to disperse that had been issued several blocks away and many hours earlier, which no reasonable person would assume applied to where I was arrested.

If this story had made national news, this is how an “objective” report would probably sound:

Freshman Tracey Hickey alleges that police used excessive force when arresting her on Friday morning for failure to disperse.

Hickey claims that police made no attempt to peacefully arrest her before they pushed her down and handcuffed her, leading to minor injuries.

Police say that Hickey failed to obey an order to disperse issued earlier in the night, and her arrest was consistent with their orders to arrest those who didn’t clear the area. Police say that when they apprehended her, Hickey was acting erratically, shouting and waving her arms on the patio, although some witnesses claim she was directing other students to safety.

Hickey is affiliated with the American Civil Liberties Union, a controversial organization boasting a history of clashes with the police. The ACLU had litigated against the Pittsburgh Police Department before the G-20 Summit was even under way, claiming an issue with permits.

867 notes

hardlighthologram:

gimptips:

tkleek013:

Anyone wanna do a fill in the blank? My life as _______ #waitwhat #kidstoys #wheelchair #lol #walmart #toysection

representation is important. this toy is important. the people who play with them are important.

People have no idea how much having medical stuff for my dolls helped me when I was younger. I have two doll wheelchairs, a Build-A-Bear “get well” set, a bald 18” ‘Sew Able’ doll (at one point between the hair thinning, scalp pain, and inability to lift my arms to care for my hair, my hair had to be cut to 1-2 inches long, and having that doll helped so much), a couple sets of Build-A-Bear scrubs, and my dolls and bears had germ masks. When I started aquatic therapy, my Sew Able doll got a swimsuit, too. She wore long sleeves to protect from the sun, just like me. Representation means so much to kids and the adults they will become.
Here are my favorite sources for inclusive dolls and bears:
Here’s a link to Sew Dolling’s "Sew Able" dolls and physical therapy and mobility equipment. They come with/without hair, with/without prosthesis, etc., and they are the same price (and better quality, IMHO) as American Girl dolls! They have a boy doll, as well!
Here's some Build-A-Bear stuff, too.
Here's a couple 18” doll outfits from Emily Rose (less $$ than AG, better quality and customer service, IMHO).
American Girl dolls can now come with/without hair and with/without hearing aids (however, they don’t come with wigs like the Sew Able dolls). Casts, crutches, and wheelchairs are also for sale.
Feel free to add more!

hardlighthologram:

gimptips:

tkleek013:

Anyone wanna do a fill in the blank? My life as _______ #waitwhat #kidstoys #wheelchair #lol #walmart #toysection

representation is important. this toy is important. the people who play with them are important.

People have no idea how much having medical stuff for my dolls helped me when I was younger. I have two doll wheelchairs, a Build-A-Bear “get well” set, a bald 18” ‘Sew Able’ doll (at one point between the hair thinning, scalp pain, and inability to lift my arms to care for my hair, my hair had to be cut to 1-2 inches long, and having that doll helped so much), a couple sets of Build-A-Bear scrubs, and my dolls and bears had germ masks. When I started aquatic therapy, my Sew Able doll got a swimsuit, too. She wore long sleeves to protect from the sun, just like me. Representation means so much to kids and the adults they will become.

Here are my favorite sources for inclusive dolls and bears:

  • Here’s a link to Sew Dolling’s "Sew Able" dolls and physical therapy and mobility equipment. They come with/without hair, with/without prosthesis, etc., and they are the same price (and better quality, IMHO) as American Girl dolls! They have a boy doll, as well!
  • Here's some Build-A-Bear stuff, too.
  • Here's a couple 18” doll outfits from Emily Rose (less $$ than AG, better quality and customer service, IMHO).
  • American Girl dolls can now come with/without hair and with/without hearing aids (however, they don’t come with wigs like the Sew Able dolls). Casts, crutches, and wheelchairs are also for sale.
  • Feel free to add more!

(via katgezicht)

82,948 notes

bisexualpiratequeen:

I’m trying hard to live by Cat Principles.

1- I am glorious above all things
2- Eat when hungry, sleep when sleepy, play when bored
3- Affection is given and received on my terms and only mine
4- Show displeasure clearly.
5- NO
6- Demand the things you want. If they aren’t given, demand them again, but louder this time.
7- If you are touched when you don’t want to be, say so. If they continue to touch you, make them bleed.

(via manicpixiedreampunx)

75,822 notes

I am not Mike Brown. I am white. I am middle class. I am female. I am small. I am not considered a threat. When police see me they see someone who looks like them. They see their mothers, their daughters, their sisters, themselves. I am not at risk of being shot by police for existing while black. I am not at risk of being shot while unarmed. I am not at risk of being shot while armed with nothing more than a BB gun. I am not at risk of being shot for reaching for my wallet. I am privileged.
But I am outraged. And if you aren’t outraged, then you aren’t paying attention. This is America in 2014. This is our reality. It’s so easy to get jaded and to ignore these atrocities, to act like this doesn’t affect us. It’s so easy to get apathetic. In the past it was the youth who protested. Where is the rage of the youth? Where is our rage?
Like I said, I am not Mike Brown. But I am outraged.
: I am not Mike Brown. (via asgardian-feminist)

(via manicpixiedreampunx)

158,729 notes

The reason women are turning you down for casual sex seems to be that, for one thing, a lot of you are calling them sluts afterward. Also, a lot of you aren’t bothering to try to be good in bed.

Terri Conley, professor of psychology and women’s studies at the University of Michigan ( link )

the accuracy

(via missauset)

(Source: vicebot, via manicpixiedreampunx)

213 notes

Abby/Abigail.

pervocracy:

When my little sister was around thirteen, she decided she wanted to go by a slight variant on her name.  Not even a different name.  Just (not actually, but along the same lines) “Abby” instead of “Abigail.”

Our family freaked out.  You would’ve thought she said “I’m dropping out of school to deal drugs and ritually sacrifice puppies” instead of “I like Abby better.”  Our parents had chosen Abigail for her, they had given her this name and she was disrespecting it and disrespecting them and basically tearing this family apart by using a slightly different name.  They would call her Abby over their dead bodies because how dare she disgrace their legacy and everything they had done for her this way.

It’s ten years later and they still only call her Abigail.  (She’s okay with it now, or maybe she’s just given up.)

People who haven’t lived in this kind of family don’t get it, I think.  There’s always someone who says “but can’t you just have a reasonable discussion with your parents about these things? surely they’ll be understanding!  you’re their child!”  And… no.  Because this is what it was like for my sister to tell them she was a popular, athletic, academically successful straight girl with a slightly different name.

Filed under emotional abuse cw dysfunctional family cw abuse emotional abuse homophobia transphobia

268 notes

Types of Obsessions and Compulsions

nettleblade:

Before I write anything here, I want to make it perfectly clear that I am not an expert.

So this is a little bit more in-depth addition to my OCD 101 post, which examines different categories of obsessions and compulsions in detail. I originally wanted to put something like this in the main post, but it, um, got too long. ^^

If you haven’t seen my first post on OCD, you should read it before this one!

Read More

Filed under ocd obsessive compulsive disorder